Parker Woodward

Does nature have what we like to call a soul?  Can it breathe or better yet hold its breath? 
The question may not be does nature exist by possessing soulful mannerisms, but rather is it worthy of such a notion? 
 If not, then why does a man stand near the surf of the ocean caressed by the soft orange shades of sunset? 
 If not, then why does a mountain stand over us like a caring father with wispy white hairs of knowledge? 
 If not, then what would warrant you or me having a soul?  If nature does have a soul, then were we to be its child or maybe the other way around in that it is to be our child?  Maybe it is like our mother whose bond we can never break. 
Every animal, every being, every life that lives and springs forth from its womb is in turn our brother, our sister, our connection. 
As we grow though, nature, like all things will die.  I once feared this but be comforted. 
Nature may die, but a soul cannot end so easily.  In us it is kept alive and in you it exists. 
Even those who have never seen an ocean can imagine water crashing against rock,
fuming with a delicate power that is not to be mocked.  Even the blind can see it, sometimes more clearly than those encumbered by our eyes that can only tell us so much.  You see…everyone and everything is connected. 
Where you may see the wavering patterns of windblown sand, another may hear the song in
 the flapping wings of the hummingbird.  If it is in our ability, we must take care of the
mother we spring from, as she becomes frail in her old age.  Why do we enjoy the sunset? 
What good avails from climbing a tree to see just a little further?  What difference does the life of any one being matter? 
Why does anything matter?  Because we are connected, because we feel in more than touch,
because we are all part of nature that is our niche of life that we remain in awe of not only our surroundings,
 not only ourselves, but also those beings around us. 

 Parker Woodward

 

 

 

Content provided by Canisius College students under the direction of Michael Noonan, PhD.